Tingsret/ejendomsret

Appropriation in the Property Law – An analysis of the substantive requirements of the appropriation in different legal areas in the Property Law

Anna Holst Fyhn

University of Southern Denmark

   Fyhn@sam.sdu.dk  

  +45 30 89 44 30/ +45 60 50 22 58 

       

Startdato: 01.02.2018

Slutdato:  31.01.2021

Projektbeskrivelse:
Ingen

Excessive Pharmaceutical prices as an anti-competitive practice in TRIPS & European Competition Law

Behrang Kianzad

University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Law, CeBIL, Center for Advanced Studies in Biomedical Innovation Law

  behrang.kianzad@jur.ku.dk  

  +45 35 33 39 07

 http://jura.ku.dk/english/staff/research/?pure=en/persons/604260 

Starting date: 1 September 2017

Completion date:  31 August 2020

Project description:

An investigation of the triangular dilemma of strong Intellectual Property protection, contra high prices of medicines as result of the global Intellectual Property regime and finally the legal-economic rationales and discourses underlying Intellectual Property Law / competition law / intervention. The aim is to establish what constitutes anti-competitive practices such as excessive prices in TRIPS & EU Competition Law, by making the case for the excessiveness of prices as an anti-competitive practice in and out of themselves from a legal-economic / competition law perspective.

Private and public property in land: Resolving property disputes in Iceland and beyond

Valgerdur Solnes

University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Law / University of Iceland, Faculty of Law

 valgerdur.solnes@jur.ku.dk

 +45 31 52 72 27

  http://jura.ku.dk/cora/ansatte/?pure=da/persons/537327

Starting date: 01.09.2015

Completion date: 31.08.2018

Project description:

The research examines the Icelandic Supreme Court’s case law on account of a 1998 legislation. The legislation granted administrative power (subject to judicial review) to determine boundaries between private and public land in Iceland. The legislature opted out of enacting special evidentiary rules, and chose to adopt procedural rules to safeguard the human rights of all relevant parties. This approach was tested by the ECtHR, who concluded that the 1998 legislation, and the case law are not in violation of the ECHR (right to property, and right to a fair trial).